Landing Zone Targets: Precision, Specificity, and Wiggle Room

A landing zone is a set of criteria used to monitor and characterize the “releasability” of a product. Landing zones allow you to take product features and system qualities and trade them off against each other to determine what an acceptable product has to be. Almost always these tradeoffs have architectural implications. If you’ve done something similar in the past, the criteria you should use to define your landing zone may be obvious. But for first time landing zone builders, I recommend you task someone who knows about the product to take a first cut at establishing landing zone criteria that is then reviewed and vetted by a small, informed group.

A business architect, product owner, or lead engineer might prepare a “proposed landing zone” of reasonable values for landing zone criteria that are questioned, challenged, and then reviewed by a small group. On one program I was involved with, the chief business architect made this initial cut. He was a former techno geek who knew his technical limits. More important, he had deep business knowledge, product vision, and had a keen sense about where to be precise and where there should be a lot of flexibility in the landing zone values.

Some transaction criteria were very precise. Since they were in the business of processing a lot of transactions, they knew their past and knew were they needed to improve (based on projected increases in transaction volumes). For example, that transaction throughput target for a particular business process was based on extrapolations from the existing implementation (taking into account the new architecture and system deployment capabilities). This is a purposefully obfuscated example:

Example Landing Zone Attribute
Characteristic Minimum Target Outstanding
Payment processing transactions per day 3,250,000 4,000,000 5,500,000

Some targets for explicit user tasks were very specific (one had a target of less than 4 hours with no errors, and an outstanding goal of 1 business day). On the other hand, many other landing zone criteria were only generally categorized as requiring either a patch, a new system release, or online update support. The definitions for what was a patch, a release or an online update were nailed down so that there was no ambiguity in what they meant.

For example, a patch was defined as a localized solution that took a month or less to implement and deploy. The goal was eventually to get closer to a week than a month, but they started out modestly. On the other hand, a release required coordination among several teams and an entire system redeployment. An online update was something a user could accomplish via an appropriate tool.

So, for example, the landing zone criteria for reconfiguring a workflow associated with a specific data update stream had minimal and target values of “release” and an outstanding value of “online update”.

When defining a landing zone for an agile product or program, carefully consider how precise you need to be and how many criteria are in your zone. Less precision allows for more wiggle room. Without enough constraints, however, it’s hard to know what is good enough. The more precise landing zone criteria are, the easier it is to tell whether you are on track to meet them. But if those landing zone criteria are too narrowly defined, there’s a danger of ignoring broader architecture and design concerns in order to focus only on specifically achieving targets.

We live in a world where there needs to be a balance. I’ll write more about who might be best suited to defining and redefining landing zones in another post.

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