Future Commitment

In early April, I spent a fun weekend at Pace University with Allen Wirfs-Brock and Mary Lynn Manns speaking with students of Pace University’s Doctor of Professional Studies in Computing program.

Mary Lynn

Mary Lynn Manns

It was a good opportunity to reconnect with Mary Lynn and to hear about new patterns in her latest book, More Fearless Change: Strategies for Making Your Ideas Happen.

Mary Lynn and Linda Rising have been working on these patterns for over a dozen years. They aren’t finished (curating long-lived patterns is an ongoing task). They continue to collect and write patterns for those who want to initiate, inspire, and sustain change in organizations they are part of or in their personal or professional life.

There isn’t one magic thing to do to institute change. Mary Lynn and Linda advise,

“You are working with humans, often in complex organizations, so results are rarely straightforward and the emergent behavior might be totally unexpected. Therefore, upfront detailed planning is rarely effective. Instead, take one small step toward your goal and see what happens. You will inevitably encounter missteps and failures along the way….uneven progress can be discouraging but may also teach you about the idea, about the organization, and, most of all, about yourself.”

Significant change often includes performing an ongoing series of experiments.

One new pattern (or strategy) in their book is Future Commitment. This one has hooked me many times.

Instead of asking a busy person for immediate help, ask them do something you need later and then wait for them to commit. Don’t worry about trying to get them to agree right away. Be patient. Keep in touch. Provide them regular information that encourages them to become more interested in your change initiative. Don’t be a pest.

Once they agree to help, solidify their commitment by recording the date and sending it in writing (along with gentle reminders so they are kept aware of their commitment). Reminders can be annoying. So include an update of what is happening and how their contribution will fit as part of a reminder. Have an alternate lined up in case that busy person can’t commit. There’s more to this strategy and the psychology behind how people commit (along with 14 other new strategies) in their book.

Like Mary Lynn and Linda, I don’t view change patterns as evil or manipulative. They are simply tools, that once aware of, you can use to engage people and get them to help you make changes.

And so here’s a future commitment if you have an urge to write about your agile experiences: We need experience reports for Agile 2016. Submit a proposal to the Agile Experience Report program. Do it soon. Within the next 30 days.

You don’t have to start writing now, but if you send in a proposal to me, it will grab my attention. Even better, if you are attending Agile 2015, we can also talk over your proposal. We ask that you write up a proposal so you get in the practice of collecting and communicating your thoughts in written form.

You could wait and submit your experience report idea via the Agile conference submission system in November. If you do, your chance of it being selected is limited. The format of the submission system makes it difficult to include details or have an ongoing conversation to sharpen your ideas. This year we had maybe 100 submissions from which we selected 20.

If you wait to submit your proposal via the conference system, it will have to really stand out from the crowd to grab our attention.

Instead, if you submit your proposal to the Agile Experience Program, it will be carefully read as soon as we receive it. If selected, we will work with you throughout the coming year. You don’t have to start writing immediately. You will get help from a shepherd as you write. As soon as you finish, your work will be published on the Agile Alliance website. You will be also invited to present your report at a future Agile conference.

I’m ready to help you write about your experience if you are ready to make a future commitment to writing. It all starts with your proposal.

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